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A Grower's Guide to the Jasmine Plant

Nothing matches the nocturnal scent of the jasmine plant for pure ambience and mystery.  No matter if you decide to grow it inside your living room or out in your garden, you won’t regret having chosen this beautiful flowering plant.  Its resplendent flowers and characteristic scent make it a great choice.  However, you should be sure to take proper care of your jasmine plant so that it will thrive.

Light Requirements

Jasmine thrives best in steady, but not harsh sunlight.  If you are planting jasmine indoors, you should find it a place by a window that gets morning sunlight, but where it does not get direct exposure to the sun at midday in the summer. 

When the jasmine gets too harsh a dose of sunlight, its leaves tend to droop and become sickly.  However, you need to be careful not to keep the plant in too shady corners of your home either.  Jasmine, when weakened by too little sunlight, is vulnerable to pathogens.

The jasmine plant is quite a popular choice for office spaces.  Often, however, office managers don’t take into account the plant's lighting needs.  Jasmine plants will not thrive under fluorescent lighting, so if you are going to use it in an office space, keep it near windows or on outdoor spaces.

 

Jasmine plants work particularly well in a lobby space because of the ventilation that the door gives it.

Watering Requirements

If you decide to plant jasmines in your garden, the best time to do so is between summer and fall. 

The best way to grow jasmines is against a trellis.  One great idea is to create an arching trellis entryway at the edge of your garden, if room allows.

Watering jasmine plants is quite easy.  You just check the soil daily to see if it is moist.  Whenever it feels dry, you water it.  When it is moist, you hold back.  You want to make sure not to starve the plant of water, but if you do not have proper drainage in your soil, and pooling occurs, you risk getting root rot - one of the most common jasmine killers.

Soil Requirements

For best results, you should look to fertilize the soil of your jasmine plant every four months. 

Use a fertilizer that contains:

One tenth nitrogen

One tenth potassium

One fifth phosphorous

Avoid using any strong fertilizer, as it will likely cause severe harm to your jasmine plant.

Pruning

Some types of jasmines require you to cut them to keep them from growing wild and unruly - especially in an office environment.  Most jasmine plants require you to cut the dead and sickly growth so that the plant can better focus its energies on growth.  A plant filled with dead branches is likely to have too much of an energy burden to really grow to its full potential.

Jasmine Diseases

The jasmine plant is a good hearty plant, but like many plants, it may fall prey to a series of pathogens. 

One of the most common is powdery mildew.  When your jasmine plant has powdery mildew, the leaves will get spots as if someone sprinkled baby powder over them.  Although you can largely rub these spots off, fungicide is the ultimate solution.

Botrytis Cinerea may also affect your jasmine plant.  Typically, this harsh fungus will show up as a series of breaks along the stems of your jasmine.  This fungus loves lower temperatures and lots of rain, so that’s when you are most likely to see it rear its ugly head.

The third of the major dangers to the jasmine is a form of nematode that attacks the roots during the warmer months - especially if the higher temperatures accompany rain.



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